Adam Ginsberg s Post Retirement eBay Income

by

adam2

Adam Ginsberg holds the elderly in great regard. It was his mother who got him started in his successful career as an eBay wizard by insisting that he list his pool table on the website. A fact that is not lost on Adam as he publicly acknowledges his mother in his manyseminars. He has often said that to repay his mother he was going to use his program to help people from her generation become financially stable. They are old they are frail they are weak and all they should look for now is a way to make money and beat the age barriers! Adam said at one of his recent seminars in Australia.

Adam Ginsberg has helped hundreds of senior citizens earn money by trading on eBay from the comfort of their homes through his renowned eBay tutorials. People from all walks, especially the ones who are retired from active working life, have found employment and entrepreneurial opportunities on eBay. Being considerate of the fact that many senior citizens may not be able to attend his workshops in person, Adam has also launched DVD and books so that they can learn the tricks of eBay at home. Adam s website receives comments and accolades from people all over the world who have benefitted from his tutorials. One happy camper wrote,

Hi Adam

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I want to tell you again how blown away I was with your seminar I saw so many ways I can use what you taught for my own seminar business. I am anxious for your affiliate program to begin, because I know so many people who I know would benefit hugely.

On a fun note, I wanted to let you know of my latest Adam Ginsberg success story. My mother is 66 years old, loves to go to garage sales and knit. After coming back from your training, we were having dinner with my parents and Craig (my husband) and I was excitedly telling them everything we learned. She told us that she had something she d like to try selling on eBay and asked if Craig would list it for her. It turns out that it was a Lenox Rudolph statue that she paid 25 cents for over the summer .25 cents!

Well, Craig used your auction optimizer, the awesome template software you provide, and listed it. The auction closed this Saturday at a record – $265.00! My mother turned 25 cents into $265.00! Needless to say, she is tickled pink and Craig is now the favourite son in law. It just goes to show you that what you teach and offer can help people of all walks earn more money.

Adam Ginsberg enjoys great respect and praise from the elder community, for he is one great mentor and speaker.

The great thing is that Adam Ginsberg s tutorials are not just for the elderly. Try it for yourself now and get a head start in living a financially better post-retirement life.

For more information about Adam Ginsberg s products and services go to http://adamginsbergreport.com. To listen to the testimonial of a satisfied customer, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FXdAPrPywA&feature=relmfu.

I want to tell you again how blown away I was with your seminar I saw so many ways I can use what you taught for my own seminar business. I am anxious for your affiliate program to begin, because I know so many people who I know would benefit hugely.

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Wednesday, April 9, 2014 

One of Australia’s most famous swimming Olympians, Stephanie Rice, 25, announced her retirement earlier today.

The swimmer addressed the Australian public in a video. Here she thanked everyone that has supported her and reflected back on her Olympic career, “It’s sad, I definitely feel like I’m losing a part of myself, but I’m really excited about what’s about to come.”

After several shoulder operations in the lead up to the 2012 London Olympics, Rice fell short of her own expectations. Disappointed with her performance, she says she wanted to give herself a year or two break before making any decisions about the future. “I felt a lot of pressure to live up to everyone’s expectations and fulfil their answers, but I knew I had to take the time for myself to get to the point where I knew 100 percent what I wanted to do,” she says.

Long-time swimming coach Michael Bohl confirmed Rice’s doubts after the London Olympics in a telephone interview with The Associated Press today. “She couldn’t get the best out of herself there,” he says “but with what she endured, she didn’t want to retire with question marks. She wanted a year or two to think about it.”

While Rice has left her career plans unanswered, she hopes to use her popularity with the Australian public as a platform to something else. “It’s safe to say that’s the new goal and new passion for me… to prove myself out of the water.”



Wednesday, July 6, 2005 

Joshua J. Goyette allegedly confessed to breaking into a Saxonburg, Pennsylvania retirement home and beating 86-year-old Gertrude “Trudy” Johanson in the early morning of June 25, 2005. The crime, which shocked the small community north of Pittsburgh, was not the only one which occurred recently at area retirement homes. Goyette is also suspected in a May incident where another apartment at the Commons of Saxonburg was broken into through a first floor window and the 90-year-old woman inside was groped while she slept.

Goyette, 25, has addresses listed in court documents in New Bedford, Massachusetts; and in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, his mother’s home.

The alleged confession was given last Thursday, June 30, 2005, in New Bedford, Massachusetts, to Pennsylvania state police investigators. Goyette is currently being held in the Butler County prison in lieu of $300,000 cash bond. He faces charges of attempted homicide, aggravated assault, burglary and criminal mischief.



Wednesday, November 23, 2011 

A report published today by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) finds that, in many cases, England’s home care system breaches the human rights of the elderly it is supposed to serve. The Close to home: older people and human rights in home care report is the result of a twelve-month investigation into care generally provided by local authorities.

Approximately half of those receiving home care, plus friends and family, providing evidence to the inquiry were satisfied with the quality of care provided. However, the report stresses that there are “systemic problems” arising from “a failure to apply a human rights approach to home care provision”. The report asserts that it is generally not the fault of individuals providing care, but serious problems exist as local authorities seem unaware of their obligations under the Human Rights Act and fail to commission, procure, and monitor care accordingly.

The report says articles two, three and eight of the European Convention on Human Rights are frequently being breached. These, respectively, cover an individual’s right to life, protection from inhumane and degrading treatment, and respect for dignity and personal independence. Criticisms include that care is not provided in a common-sense manner, and funding of care for the elderly is at lower levels than for younger people with similar problems and needs.

The EHRC’s investigation highlights a range of recurring complaints and attempts to identify the underlying causes; cost is repeatedly mentioned, with use of the private-sector leading to some local authorities offering a “one size fits all” service leaving many elderly feeling they are “a task to be undertaken” and have “little or no choice” as to help received, or when care workers visit. A failure to invest in care workers is noted, with significant responsibility and the wide range of skills required being rewarded with low pay and status; this, the report states, adversely impacts staff retention and, a high turnover of care workers can put the security of care recipients at-risk.

Within the wider investigation, a commissioned independent social report by The Arndale Centre conducted in-depth interviews with a cross-section of 40 elderly individuals receiving home care. As-stressed in the report, those selected were not on the basis of good, or bad, experiences with their – mainly local authority-provided – care. It highlights a widespread feeling amongst those interviewed that they are treated “like a number”, and that aspects of the care provided lead to, or fail to resolve, feelings of social isolation.

The Manchester-based Arndale Centre report concludes that, “[t]he general picture is of a wider home care system in which older people are not effectively involved: which they do not understand, and which does not often make the extra effort required to involve them in ways tailored to their state of health and other needs”.

A recurring theme in the responses of those interviewed is the social isolation that their home care is not adequately addressing. One male interviewee in his seventies who previously used a scooter to get about said in his interview, “I haven’t been out of the house now for about four weeks. I daren’t. The last time I went out on the scooter I hit the kerb and it frightened the living daylights out of me.” Another, an 85-year-old woman who lives alone, expressed sadness at her inability to do normal things, “I would love to go to town to do some shopping. I haven’t been to town for about two years… Wander round the town and have a cup of tea… I’d love that.”

The social isolation many elderly experience was summed up neatly by another woman in her eighties in her interview: “When you go now, I will maybe not talk to anybody till tomorrow; maybe the whole of tomorrow nobody to talk [to]… face to face. Nobody will knock on that door, that is it, a life of isolation.”

The EHRC, having commissioned this report in the face of funding changes and reform of the care system, intends to press for legislative changes to ensure those receiving care at home are given the same protections under the Human Rights Act as those in residential care. In the conclusions of their report they offer to work with, and support, local authorities in understanding and delivering care that respects peoples’ rights and dignity; and, recommend better guidance as to the choices available to the elderly, and their families, be made available.



Submitted by: Andy Crickett

Most people use kitchen appliances in most aspects of our daily lives. Normally they are a source of convenience and service at home, but when they stop doing work, it’s a whole another problem. A machine it’s not functioning correctly, or which has stopped working permanently, could cause serious interruptions and troubles in our daily routines. It might looks like a good idea to take away the appliance in this types of issue, but that’s typically not your very best step. Rather than, you should call a major Surrey Appliance Repair provider to determine if the electronic devise should be fixed. You will get your home life back in line so you can save big financially.

Wishing to deal with home appliance maintenance without any help is natural. Those of us who have a good level of technological know-how typically notice appliances as yet another appliance to be used apart and repaired. Then again, appliances are often more complicated than they first show up, and having anything even slightly mistaken during the repair service process can develop more of an issue compared to first concern posed. In the case of a cooktop or perhaps an oven repair, for instance, a mistake while fixing it could create a serious fire hazard. If something goes wrong during or after the DIY washer dryer repair, you will be looking at main water damage or electrical safety issues. Licensed Surrey Appliance Repair technicians already went through a extensive techniques and have the experience along with the equipment to determine and deal with whatever is wrong with the house appliances. Contact on them how to ensure the work gets done with the proper service and oversight.

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With today’s economic situation, who can manage to be constantly updating to the newest and greatest or working out to acquire a new appliance at the first sign of refrigerator or washing machine problems? The fact remains that cash is tight for lots of folks, but simply because you’re on a funds does not mean you cannot afford to get appliances that actually work effectively and well. A professional Surrey Appliance Repair service is a remarkably economical way to keep all the appliances you count on every day, our washing machine, dishwasher, oven, fridge, and more, working in tip-top condition. Right now, appliance repair isn’t miserly; it is just simply smart!

Surrey Appliance Repair pros can easily handle a number of issues with most household appliances. That signifies whether you’ll need washing machine repair or dryer repair, these types of experts can really help. They’ll be able to correctly identify just about any issue and then provide the accurate maintenance you should get your home appliance back to working properly and dependably. Oftentimes the cause with the problem is unexpectedly smaller: a loose bolt could make your washing machine rattle and shake while a defective water inlet device can avoid your dishwasher from filling–and subsequently cleaning–correctly. Specialist Surrey Appliance Repair technicians will only take a moment to pinpoint these kind of failures, and the methods are both fast and remarkably affordable. So why run out and pay hundreds of dollars for a new appliance when the solution may be a $30 part and half an hour of the home appliance repairman’s time.

About the Author: For more information, get in touch with :

surreyappliancerepair.com

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Saturday, March 14, 2009 

Rico Daniels is a British TV presenter living in France who is known for his two television series — The Salvager — whilst he still lived in the UK and then Le Salvager after he moved to France. Rico has been in a variety of jobs but his passion is now his profession – he turns unwanted ‘junk’ into unusual pieces of furniture. Rico’s creations and the methods used to fabricate them are the subject of the Salvager shows.

Rico spoke to Wikinews in January about his inspiration and early life, future plans, other hobbies and more. Read on for the full exclusive interview, published for the first time:

Wikinews How was it you first came to be interested in salvaging?

I grew up in Basildon New Town very close to the enormous spoil heap that later became the green hills of Gloucester Park. There was all sorts of stuff dumped by developers and local businesses that was pure treasure trove to all the London kids that had moved down there. I suppose I was actively seeking play material from as young as 5 I suppose. My dad had big plans for me and tended to buy me “educational” stuff for Xmas. Things like encyclopaedias, microscope, chemistry set. That sort of stuff. Great for the brain but not what you’d call a toy. I ended up playing with my dad’s tools and using whatever I could drag off the spoil heap as material.

WN What makes ‘good’ rubbish, and how do you tell it apart from other junk?

I dont look at junk as junk. To me its raw material like any other but with added benefits. I like to preserve the patina of age and sometimes decay where it brings an interesting element to a build. Faded paintwork and oxidised metal are dripping with history and add shedloads of character to anything they’re included in. Materials obviously have to be sound and usable otherwise you’d just be using crap to make more crap.

WN What differences are there between salvaging in your home of France and back here in Britain, and what simply doesn’t change when you cross the border?

The advantages of France as a source of build material is that there are so many more opportunities to chance on stuff that may be 2 or even 3 centuries old. Hand made hinges and latches, ancient oak boards etc. My favourite hunting places are the ashes of old farmers fires . I pull out astonishingly interesting bits of hand forged ironwork. The thing that stays constant from one country to the other is that people can have amazingly good stuff but see little or no value in it leaving the field wide open for anyone that has a little vision.

WN You say on your website that you are working on an idea for a new show. Can you tell us a bit more about that?

Theres not much I can say about doing a new show apart from the fact that whatever I did I would insist on retaining my integrity. My shows have all been optimistic and upbeat which I would have thought the essential ingredients of any TV to take us through a recession. Don’t think I could do the nasty vote -the -others off type show. I certainly wouldn’t be happy adhering to the clicheed scripts so many celebs seem happy to stick to and you will never see Rico Daniels wearing a frock on the Paul O Grady show. Seems a step too low for a bit of cash.

WN When you go out looking for materials, presumably you never know what you’re going to find. When you look at what’s available, how do you come up with a vision of what you’re going to make from it?

The best work I do grows over time. I have hundreds of galvanised boxes full of “components”. I like assembling the elements of a build to be like a piece of art. TV demands a faster pace than I normally like which was fun though at some point I would like people to see what can really be created with a bit of care and careful planning.

WN You are also into a bit of axe throwing, I understand. Do you ever do this competitively?

My axe throwing which has been more implied than seen was something that I started doing at “western” camps in Germany. It was organised as a competition there hitting a range of targets on marked posts. I use it now as a way of letting off steam. I also throw circular saw blades usually at a target I call WMD Tony. Chills you right out.

WN As you rightly mentioned when you announced your new show concept, it is very hard to get a hold of money these days in any sizable amount – people are holding on to it. What effect has this got on salvaging – will it encourage it as people look for alternatives, or will the supply of cheap materials be decreased?

I have always found an increase in the amount of stuff available in a recession. A lot more people turn to DIY, ripping out salvageable stuff that a man such as myself could use. I have seen tons of good gear as Ive been going round London over the last fortnight. It broke my heart to leave it in the skips.

WN Between writing for Brit Chopper magazine and customizing your jeep, you clearly enjoy the open road. What do you look for in a vehicle? Given the chance to have any one ride you wanted, what would you be driving?

As far as vehicles, go, the Jeep Wrangler presses all the right buttons for me. It is totally suited to the area I live and though an accursed 4×4 I plan my trips carefully to do as many things on a single journey as possible. I would lay money that I create less CO2 than a lot of eco drivers in “green” vehicles and what I do create I hope is being absorbed by the huge number of maturing trees I planted on my own land. I would like to build a trike for France though the French law is difficult in respect of a custom vehicle. Hopefully there will be a way through the red tape and I can get one under way. I also have an emergency 250 in the barn that so aint as harley I ain’t gonna dignify it with a description.



Saturday, March 14, 2009 

Rico Daniels is a British TV presenter living in France who is known for his two television series — The Salvager — whilst he still lived in the UK and then Le Salvager after he moved to France. Rico has been in a variety of jobs but his passion is now his profession – he turns unwanted ‘junk’ into unusual pieces of furniture. Rico’s creations and the methods used to fabricate them are the subject of the Salvager shows.

Rico spoke to Wikinews in January about his inspiration and early life, future plans, other hobbies and more. Read on for the full exclusive interview, published for the first time:

Wikinews How was it you first came to be interested in salvaging?

I grew up in Basildon New Town very close to the enormous spoil heap that later became the green hills of Gloucester Park. There was all sorts of stuff dumped by developers and local businesses that was pure treasure trove to all the London kids that had moved down there. I suppose I was actively seeking play material from as young as 5 I suppose. My dad had big plans for me and tended to buy me “educational” stuff for Xmas. Things like encyclopaedias, microscope, chemistry set. That sort of stuff. Great for the brain but not what you’d call a toy. I ended up playing with my dad’s tools and using whatever I could drag off the spoil heap as material.

WN What makes ‘good’ rubbish, and how do you tell it apart from other junk?

I dont look at junk as junk. To me its raw material like any other but with added benefits. I like to preserve the patina of age and sometimes decay where it brings an interesting element to a build. Faded paintwork and oxidised metal are dripping with history and add shedloads of character to anything they’re included in. Materials obviously have to be sound and usable otherwise you’d just be using crap to make more crap.

WN What differences are there between salvaging in your home of France and back here in Britain, and what simply doesn’t change when you cross the border?

The advantages of France as a source of build material is that there are so many more opportunities to chance on stuff that may be 2 or even 3 centuries old. Hand made hinges and latches, ancient oak boards etc. My favourite hunting places are the ashes of old farmers fires . I pull out astonishingly interesting bits of hand forged ironwork. The thing that stays constant from one country to the other is that people can have amazingly good stuff but see little or no value in it leaving the field wide open for anyone that has a little vision.

WN You say on your website that you are working on an idea for a new show. Can you tell us a bit more about that?

Theres not much I can say about doing a new show apart from the fact that whatever I did I would insist on retaining my integrity. My shows have all been optimistic and upbeat which I would have thought the essential ingredients of any TV to take us through a recession. Don’t think I could do the nasty vote -the -others off type show. I certainly wouldn’t be happy adhering to the clicheed scripts so many celebs seem happy to stick to and you will never see Rico Daniels wearing a frock on the Paul O Grady show. Seems a step too low for a bit of cash.

WN When you go out looking for materials, presumably you never know what you’re going to find. When you look at what’s available, how do you come up with a vision of what you’re going to make from it?

The best work I do grows over time. I have hundreds of galvanised boxes full of “components”. I like assembling the elements of a build to be like a piece of art. TV demands a faster pace than I normally like which was fun though at some point I would like people to see what can really be created with a bit of care and careful planning.

WN You are also into a bit of axe throwing, I understand. Do you ever do this competitively?

My axe throwing which has been more implied than seen was something that I started doing at “western” camps in Germany. It was organised as a competition there hitting a range of targets on marked posts. I use it now as a way of letting off steam. I also throw circular saw blades usually at a target I call WMD Tony. Chills you right out.

WN As you rightly mentioned when you announced your new show concept, it is very hard to get a hold of money these days in any sizable amount – people are holding on to it. What effect has this got on salvaging – will it encourage it as people look for alternatives, or will the supply of cheap materials be decreased?

I have always found an increase in the amount of stuff available in a recession. A lot more people turn to DIY, ripping out salvageable stuff that a man such as myself could use. I have seen tons of good gear as Ive been going round London over the last fortnight. It broke my heart to leave it in the skips.

WN Between writing for Brit Chopper magazine and customizing your jeep, you clearly enjoy the open road. What do you look for in a vehicle? Given the chance to have any one ride you wanted, what would you be driving?

As far as vehicles, go, the Jeep Wrangler presses all the right buttons for me. It is totally suited to the area I live and though an accursed 4×4 I plan my trips carefully to do as many things on a single journey as possible. I would lay money that I create less CO2 than a lot of eco drivers in “green” vehicles and what I do create I hope is being absorbed by the huge number of maturing trees I planted on my own land. I would like to build a trike for France though the French law is difficult in respect of a custom vehicle. Hopefully there will be a way through the red tape and I can get one under way. I also have an emergency 250 in the barn that so aint as harley I ain’t gonna dignify it with a description.



Wednesday, October 25, 2006 

On November 1, 2006 the old five, ten, twenty and fifty cent coins will be illegal tender, but the Reserve Bank of New Zealand says there are still at least 100 million still to be returned.

According to the Reserve Bank, most of the old coins have been lost in drains or buried in rubbish. “We think there is still another 100 million sitting around in people’s homes,” Brian Lang, currency manger for the Reserve Bank, said.

Lang said: “So far, just over 280 million coins have been returned, but there are more out there. Since 1967 the Reserve Bank has issued more than a billion of the old ‘silver’ coins. So if you don’t want to be stuck with loads of old coin – there’s never been a better time to empty your coin jars, sweep the car glove box and rummage behind the couch cushions.”

The coins still awaiting to be handed in, by either spending them, taking them to a bank or donating them to charity, are estimated to be worth between NZ$5 million and $50 million.

“A last-minute burst of publicity may convince people to bring the coins in. It’s a bit of a hassle though. Human nature being what it is, people just don’t care,” Lang said. The Karori Wildlife Sanctuary located in Wellington say that they have collected over $9,000 in old coins. Sanctuary spokesman, Alan Dicks said: “The campaign was particularly fitting because the old coins depicted tuataras and kiwis, both of which can be found living at the sanctuary. The money will go towards supporting general ecological restoration of the sanctuary. We want to get over ten grand, but the more the better.”

Lang said: “Though the coins will no longer be legal tender, banks will continue to exchange them until at least the end of the year,” and the Reserve Bank will always exchange them. “We are still getting people coming in with two-dollar notes,” Lang added.



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Submitted by: Diane Kirby

Apprenticeships are available to help you gain a nationally recognised qualification with the opportunity to either carry on working or into further education following this. In order to ensure that the experience is of benefit to your future prospects, it is imperative that you choose the correct apprenticeship for you.

As searching for a course to benefit you in the future can be quite a complex process it is greatly advisable for you to get assistance from a specialised company that provides a complete service. With a training solution provider such as Open Doors Media, they work with all parties involved including the apprentices, employers and the learning providers, this is to ensure that the apprenticeship experience is advantageous for all concerned. The company is ready and willing to assist you in the decision of which area you would like to work in and will help you get the most suitable employment opportunity of your choice.

There are any levels of apprenticeship courses available, from a basic Level 1 to a Level 3 Advanced, allowing you to start with a basic apprenticeship and work your way through to progress to the next level if you choose to. A service provider is there to help you determine which entry level is suitable for you.

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When you have made the important decision of which sector you would like to work in, the next step is obviously your application for an apprenticeship vacancy. If you choose to receive help from a professional company, they will be happy to help you complete your application and step by step guide you through the process. A great advantage of doing an apprenticeship is the fact that you get paid while still learning, the service provider will be able to give you assistance and advice regarding funding and will explain to you how the process works, and how much you are likely to be paid.

Often searching for the information required by yourself can be quite confusing and stressful which is why people tend to opt for a service provider to relieve them of these worries. They are experienced in the knowledge of how to locate appropriate apprenticeship vacancies, which is an asset of extreme value. It can take time to find the correct apprentice ship vacancy, and with new ones becoming available on a daily basis, it is important that you register with a provider in order to be able to gain access to the very latest vacancies. In the very instant that a vacancy in which you have shown an interest in shows up, the provider will let you know straight away.

During the time of leaving school is a pivotal point of your life where you are face with a huge amount of possibilities. Whether you decide to stay in further education, find work, or the two combined with an apprenticeship to offer you the best of both worlds. This will allow you to carry on learning while gaining work experience and earning a reasonable income.

If you require expert advice from an apprenticeship provider then look no further than Open Doors Media who will answer all of your questions and listen to each and every situation with great understanding in order to help you make the right decisions. The service is fantastic in the way that it doesn’t only offer help and advice to apprentices but also help parents with their questions and queries. To get started with the aid of professional help and advice today visit www.opendoorsmedia.co.uk and their friendly and experienced team will be more than happy to help you to the best of their great potential.

About the Author: Diane Kirby is the lead author for the UK based Wholesale Shoe Reviews website. Diane’s primary responsibilities consist of article authoring, content creation and comment moderation for the review site. Diane has been working as the primary author both this site and many others for a number of years.Open Doors Media are a well established company who can help young people around the country find

opendoorsmedia.co.uk

in their chosen industry.

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Wednesday, March 29, 2006  Local Government workers in the UK withdrew their labour yesterday as part of a dispute over pension entitlements. The members of 11 different trades unions were involved in the 24hr strike. As the day began they declared that support for the strike was solid. Although the strikers work for local councils, their pay and conditions are agreed nationally. The Local Government Association which represents the local councils in England and Wales declared predictions that 1.5 million people would stay away from work as “wildly optimistic”.

The Unions’ complaint is that local government workers are being treated unfavourably compared to other public sector employees. They say that agreements on pensions that have been reached with civil servants, teachers and health workers will allow those staff to continue to retire at 60 while local government staff will be forced to work until they are 65. Civil servants work for national government, teachers work for local councils but have their own pension arrangements and most health workers are employed by the state-controlled National Health Service.

The Local Government Association claims that if council workers continue to be able to retire at 60, it will increase the levels of Council Tax (a tax on people living in properties which funds a proportion of local government expenditure) by 2%.

The striking workers provide a wide range of services from assisting teachers in the class room, through inspecting kitchens for hygiene to provising care to the vulnerable in society. In some places council workers collect tolls for road tunnels or manage ferries. Mainstream media have reported on the strike all day with heavy coverage of disruption to commuters where transport has been affected. The unions have emphasised the large number of their members who are women working in low paid jobs.

The Government which regulates the scheme claimed that the early retirement provisions (called the rule of 85) were age-discriminatory and had to be removed.

The strike ended at midnight. The Unions have not declared any further strike days.

The Unions involved were AEP, AMICUS, CYWU, GMB, NAPO, NIPSA, NUJ, NUT, TGWU, UCATT and UNISON.

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